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Franis
dialoguers
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From A Dialoguer Who Writes
I'm happy to offer the benefit of my observations. I would love to know how or if you can use what I've been exploring here.

If you'd like to contact me personally to get in touch, check out my website.

August 2009
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Franis [userpic]
Why Defend Routines?

On the subject of why people defend their cultivated routines, I thought you might enjoy a quote from
David Bohm,(physicist/philosopher) from his writing, "On Creativity" p. 24:

"And the key is, as I have indicated, to be continually aware of and alert to the basically mechanical reactions that are always causing us to "go to sleep" again and again...

Just what are these reactions? This is to complex a question to be gone into in detail here. But, roughly, it can be said that the root of the trouble can be found in the confusion between what is really creative and the mechanical continuation of the results of past conditioning. For example, each person will note that, either tacitly or explicitly, he is according extremely great importance and value to certain comforts, pleasures, stimulating sources of a "tingling" sense of excitement and euphoria, secure and satisfying routines of life, actions that are necessary to his feeling of being an accepted and worthwhile sort of person, and various other mental responses that are felt to be of a supreme degree of psychological significance. Indeed, such responses often seem so basic to the psyche that one feels that he cannot bear to have them seriously disturbed. Even more, it may often appear that they are inseparable parts of one's "very self," so that all the creative possibilities of the mind would depend on first seeing to it that they are in a right order (as all one's physical actions depend on obtaining an adequate supply of the right kind of food). However, closer observation shows that the continuation of these responses is not really necessary for happiness and creation, and that, on the contrary, they are actually nothing but mechanical results of past conditioning, being in fact the principal barriers to real joy and creativity." - David Bohm